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19/10/18

Retweetd From UCAS

Parents! Needs some help understanding UCAS applications, deadlines, student finance? We have info just for you! Sign up here.

19/10/18

Masterclasses running this half term can be found via the below link: https://t.co/DRfZ0kojaH

19/10/18

If you haven't already done so, why not read the weekly 'must read' books - our next one is a spine-tingling thriller by Sue Wallman. https://t.co/1t6MfcKLJk

19/10/18

Mindfulness this week continues with a NNJR of how stress and feeling anxious, affects the body. Students will cover meditation exercises and the benefits of these exercises for young people. https://t.co/fbN0cRy85A

19/10/18

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Harris Girls' Academy Bromley is hiring . Apply now https://t.co/U4T7OaKoF6 https://t.co/85Bi87bZiz

18/10/18

Retweetd From HarrisSchoolDirect

The action continues in the labs of with the trainees completing a different set of practicals. https://t.co/RJNCdOe04A

18/10/18

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Our trainees are loving getting involved in the sessions to help to develop their skills! Thank you to the incredible Miss Dent and Miss Ellison training https://t.co/eOzI2819nP

18/10/18

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Our trainees are in labs at practising the GCSE required practical tasks. Today they are scientists, biologists, chemists, physicists... and amazing, all at the same time. https://t.co/ZavtnJc1AC

18/10/18

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Our &T trainees are taking advantage of our of academies by working with the brilliant Amy French from ! https://t.co/5w60rfQ80W

18/10/18

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The &T trainees have started their training day with a focus on ! They're &making characters from fabric! https://t.co/G4pZDGhFvr

18/10/18

Retweetd From HarrisSchoolDirect

We've had a great start to our training day ! &T and trainees

17/10/18

HGABR are teaming up with the Bromley Rotary Club as part of the Youth Awards 2018. https://t.co/XzuuoR72ZO

17/10/18

Quote of the week: "Liberty, when it begins to take root, is a plant of rapid growth." George Washington

16/10/18

Our students enjoyed helping out with , while wearing their t-shirts with pride https://t.co/I34AaMl0xM

16/10/18

It was a pleasure to help out

16/10/18

Try your hand at our other math's tutor programme challenges this week. https://t.co/RLmPX31r5O

16/10/18

This weeks group read item is about the news item surrounding judges that are in line for a £60k pay rise. Students will be asked to summarise the main points of the article and discuss their thoughts in groups. https://t.co/A1pvhJg325

16/10/18

Y11 Mock exams are coming up after the half term, so don't forget to put into practice your NNJR revision techniques.

15/10/18

Retweetd From UK Safer Internet

Online challenges and peer pressure - advice for parents and carers to help start a conversation with young people about the risks associated with online challenges. https://t.co/5YhjGyYdUu

15/10/18

Reflections this week is looking at the use of stereotypes and how this effects peoples perception in regards to the workforce and other areas. https://t.co/AwGPN5bXC2

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Posted on May 27th 2018

Academic Corner - What is the right thing to do?

This was the challenging and worthy subject of a recent Academic Lecture. You have £30; should you buy something for yourself or spend it on a friend? You’ve forgotten to buy your mum a birthday card; do you admit you don’t care enough about her to remember or lie and say it got lost in the post?

For centuries philosophers have tried to come up with water-tight, fail-safe equations to apply to any situation you might find yourself in and establish what the ‘right’ thing to do is. In order to find answers to these tricky scenarios we considered two of the most famous ethical theories: utilitarianism and rule-based theories.

Utilitarianism argues that an action is right if it produces the highest utility (utility being the overall balance of pleasure and pain produced by an action). Bentham, the famous 18th Century ethicist, stated ‘Nature has placed mankind under the governance of two sovereign masters, pain and pleasure. It is for them alone to point out what we ought to do’.

In contrast to Utilitarians, Kant, another 18th Century philosopher, argued that acts are right or wrong in and of themselves, because of the kinds of acts they are and not simply because of their ends or consequences. Duty is not based on the pain or pleasure of the outcome, but on a set of immovable moral principles; the categorical imperative.

To illustrate what these theories mean in practice, we looked to the ‘Trolley Problem’. This notorious dilemma outlines the following situation:

         
   

There is a runaway trolley barrelling down the railway tracks. Ahead, on the tracks, there are five people tied up and unable to move. The trolley is headed straight for them. You are standing some distance off in the train yard, next to a lever. If you pull this lever, the trolley will switch to a different set of tracks. However, you notice that there is one person on the side track. You have two options: (1) Do nothing, and the trolley kills the five people on the main track. (2) Pull the lever, diverting the trolley onto the side track where it will kill one person. Which is the correct choice?

   
         

Both theories, rule-based and utilitarian, argue the best option is to pull the lever, thereby killing one person rather than 5. For the utilitarian this is because it’s a lesser evil to kill one person than five. For the rule-based ethicist, by pulling the lever you are acting in accordance with the principle that it is wrong to kill to avoid the deaths of five people. That this will result in the death of one person does not jeopardise your moral purity.

The dilemma becomes more interesting with the introduction of the ‘fat man’. In this problem, instead of a switch to divert the trolley there is a fat man on a bridge who, if you push off it, will stop the trolley, thereby saving the five people in its path but losing his own life in the process.

Interestingly men were more likely to be happy to sacrifice the fat man than women. People were also more likely to be happy to push the fat person off the bridge if they were male. So does this mean men always take a utilitarian, greatest-happiness approach when faced with moral dilemmas?

Finally, we considered Winston Churchill’s tactics during the Second World War. He, controversially, intentionally mislead German bomber planes during the Blitz so that they thought they were dropping their V-1 bombs on central London and Parliament, they were actually dropping them on areas of south London, considered to be less important, such as Bromley. He took a utilitarian approach – was it the right thing to do?

By Miss Heaton-Armstrong